Visit Alamosa

Walk the Rio Grande in Downtown Alamosa   Courtesy Marilyn Loser

Walk the Rio Grande in Downtown Alamosa. Courtesy Marilyn Loser

Experience Alamosa Natural Resources and Native American Peoples.

Feel like enjoying the out of doors? Explore the banks of the Rio Grande, the Alamosa Ranch, and Cole Park – all are within walking distance of downtown Alamosa. Leashed pets are welcome and you just might see some deer. Extensive trails lead through the bosque in the Alamosa Ranch. Enjoy birding or just looking at the soaring Sangre de Cristo Mountains to the east or the San Juans to the west.

Want to travel a bit further afield? Head to the Alamosa National Wildlife Refuge for walking, birding, photography, or gentle winter cross-country skiing.

The Blanca Wetlands (BLM) provide  birding, photographic, and cross-country experiences. The wetlands are closed to the public during nesting season from February 15 to July 15. Directions: From the intersection of US 160 and CO 17 in Alamosa, head five miles north and turn right (east) on CR 2S. Proceed seven miles east to the entrance gate.

Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve  Coutesy National Parks Service

Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve. Coutesy National Parks Service

A trip to the San Luis Valley isn’t complete without a visit to the Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve.  Its open year round and the visitors’ center and bookstore is staffed by friendly and knowledgeable people. Take a look at the Native American site tree bark markings while you’re there.

Birding enthusiasts can take a look at the extensive Alamosa Birding website.

After exploring the out-of-doors, visit the Luther Bean Museum (Richardson Hall on the Adams State College campus) and the SLV History Museum (401 Hunt Ave.) for Native American displays and information.  While most of the information is not SLV based,  it is related to nomadic tribes moving through the area and the pueblos of New Mexico to the south.

Experience Peoples, Traditions and Hispano Culture

The Rio Grande and railroads were key in attracting settlers to Alamosa County.  Regional mining and local agriculture benefited from the railroad. Ride the rails over La Veta Pass on the Rio Grande Scenic Railroad, enjoy the blending of cultures in the architecture of Alamosa churches and building, and experience the ranching life on Centennial Farms such as the Medano-Zapata Ranch.

Alamosa Railyard 1900.  Courtesy Alamosa Library

Alamosa Railyard 1900. Courtesy Alamosa Library

Visit the Wayside stage stop on the North River Road and ride bikes and experience great views. Don’t forget to visit the Colorado Welcome Center at the Railway station on 6th Street downtown for more information.

Will you be here on a Saturday after July 4 and before mid October? If so, don’t miss the Valley Farmers’ Market in Alamosa – you’ll find many local foods including baked products from Amish and Mennonite families and famous SLV produce. In the fall, follow your nose to witness the roasting of New Mexico and Colorado chiles. Find local farms and ranches via an interactive map.

Semillas de la Tierra performance: Sundays at Six  Courtesy Adams State College

Semillas de la Tierra performance: Sundays at Six Courtesy Adams State College

Here on a summer Sunday evening? Join the locals for the Alamosa Live Music Association Sundays @ Six free concerts, June through August.

No matter the weather, you can take the Alamosa Downtown Walking Tour. Download the .pdf brochure. Stroll around Alamosa’s downtown to experience its history and small-town charm. From red brick to pressed metal ornamentation, Alamosa is a study in the architectural trends that have passed through the nation since the 19th century.

Restored 1877 Masonic Temple is now retail space.  Coutesy Alamosa Uptown and River Association

Restored 1877 Masonic Temple is now retail space. Coutesy Alamosa Uptown and River Association

Check out our history museums — visit the Luther Bean Museum (Richardson Hall on the Adams State College campus) and the SLV History Museum (401 Hunt Ave.) for Native American displays and information.  While most of the information is not SLV based,  it is related to nomadic tribes moving through the area and the pueblos of New Mexico to the south.

For a more contemporary spin visit the Cloyde Snook Art Gallery or Community Partnerships Gallery on the Adams State College campus.